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You searched for: subject:"Namibia"
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[texts]South-West Africa - Eveleigh, William, b. 1882

Keywords: Namibia
Downloads: 603
[texts]South-West Africa - Eveleigh, William, 1882-
26
Keywords: Namibia
Downloads: 368
[audio]Namibia
Namibia
Keywords: Namibia
Downloads: 5,429
[image]Hydrogen Sulfide Eruption Along the Coast of Namibia - Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
A milky green cloud of water off the Namib Desert coast of Namibia in southern Africa is a tell-tale sign of sulfur rising to the surface. The yellowish clouds of sulfur come from hydrogen sulfide gas produced by anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) at the ocean floor. In this region, strong currents bring abundant food from the bottom of the ocean to nurture large plant and animal populations...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Hydrogen suplhide eruptions along the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Bright green-blue water along the shore of Namibia indicated that another hydrogen sulfide eruption was underway on April 26, 2004. The eruptions, which are deadly to fish, occur when bacteria release hydrogen sulfide gas as they break down dead plants and animals that have sunk to the sea floor. As the gas rises to the surface, it interacts with oxygen to form solid white sulfur, which tints the water the bright green color seen here.Hydrogen sulfide eruptions happen frequently off the shore of...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions and phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Bright colors in the ocean waters off the coast of Namibia tell a story of marine life and death. In this region of the South Atlantic, winds push the warm surface water westward, and cold waters from the bottom of the ocean rush up in their place. The cold water carries with it the nutrients that have sunk to the ocean floor, providing a boon to ocean life. In particular, microscopic plants called phytoplankton thrive on the added nutrients...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 3
[image]Dust Continues Streaming from Namibia - Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE
Dust continues to stream away from the northern Namibian coastline in this SeaWiFS image. Sensor: OrbView-2/SeaWiFS. Data Start Date: 5/11/00.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Dust blowing off Namibia - NASA image created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data obtained from the team.
Tendrils of dust swept off the west coast of Namibia and spread over the Atlantic in early July 2005. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite took this picture on July 10, 2005.In this image, faint plumes of dust that stretch over several hundred kilometers blow in a southwesterly direction off the coast. To the north and east of the dust is the Etosha Pan, a low expanse of land filled with clay, silt, and mineral salts...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Starting as a narrow strip on the northern coastline of Namibia and continuing to the south, where it widens to nearly 100 miles across (left of center), is the Namib Desert. The Namib is thought to be the world's oldest desert, existing for the past 55 million years, and receives in some sections as little as 5mm of rain a year. There are several dry riverbeds, particularly in the north and further moisture is provided from sporadic thick fogs rolling in from the coast...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 9
[image]Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast - Image courtesy the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean’s floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite.The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean’s floor off of ...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions and phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Bright colors in the ocean waters off the coast of Namibia tell a story of marine life and death. In this region of the South Atlantic, winds push the warm surface water westward, and cold waters from the bottom of the ocean rush up in their place. The cold water carries with it the nutrients that have sunk to the ocean floor, providing a boon to ocean life. In particular, microscopic plants called phytoplankton thrive on the added nutrients...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 3
[image]Seasonal floods along the Zambezi River - Image courtesy Jesse Allen, based on data from the at NASA GSFC
Officials in Namibia worked quickly to evacuate more people in the southern Caprivi Strip as a second wave of flooding on the Zambezi River pushed south toward Lake Liambezi. The lake has been dry since 1985, and the flood waters are expected to spread quickly as the lake fills. The Caprivi Strip began to flood in early February, far earlier than the typical rainy season floods. This year’s floods have affected some 50,000 people and are being called the worst floods the region has seen since ...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruption along the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
A milky green cloud of water off the Namib Desert coast of Namibia in southern Africa is a tell-tale sign of sulfur rising to the surface. The yellowish clouds of sulfur come from hydrogen sulfide gas produced by anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) at the ocean floor. In this region, strong currents bring abundant food from the bottom of the ocean to nurture large plant and animal populations...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 3
[image]Hydrogen Sulfide Eruptions along the Coast of Namibia - Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
On April 18, 2004, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite detected several bright green hydrogen sulfide eruptions along the coast of Namibia. The eruptions, which are deadly to fish, occur when bacteria release hydrogen sulfide gas as they break down dead plants and animals that have sunk to the sea floor. As the gas rises to the surface, it interacts with oxygen to form solid white sulfur, which tints the water the bright green color seen here.Hydrogen...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Hydrogen Sulfide Eruption Along the Coast of Namibia - Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
Bright colors in the ocean waters off the coast of Namibia tell a story of marine life and death. In this region of the South Atlantic, winds push the warm surface water westward, and cold waters from the bottom of the ocean rush up in their place. The cold water carries with it the nutrients that have sunk to the ocean floor, providing a boon to ocean life. In particular, microscopic plants called phytoplankton thrive on the added nutrients...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Namibian Dust Storm - Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE
This recent SeaWiFS image shows dust blowing over the South Atlantic from northern Namibia. Sensor: OrbView-2/SeaWiFS. Data Start Date: 8/16/99.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Sulfur Plume Off Namibia - Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
Off the coast of Namibia in southwest Africa, a cold, deep current snakes northward past the Namib Desert carrying icy waters from deep in the Southern Ocean off Antarctica. Year-round southerly winds cause the warmer surface waters near the coast to be deflected westward away from shore, and the cold waters of the Benguela Current rise up from the depths to replace them.In the ocean, the welling up of cold water has a positive influence on living organisms...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions and phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Bright colors in the ocean waters off the coast of Namibia tell a story of marine life and death. In this region of the South Atlantic, winds push the warm surface water westward, and cold waters from the bottom of the ocean rush up in their place. The cold water carries with it the nutrients that have sunk to the ocean floor, providing a boon to ocean life. In particular, microscopic plants called phytoplankton thrive on the added nutrients...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
This MODIS true-color image, acquired March 4, 2002, shows a phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia. Phytoplankton is a microscopic organism that utilizes chlorophyll, which sunlight reflects off of to create this intense blue-green color in the water. Also prominent in this image is the Skeleton Coast Game Park, which runs along Namibia's northern coast and here glows a beautiful coral-orange color...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Ugab River, Namibia - Image provided by the Satellite Systems Branch as part of the Earth as Art II image series
Elusive, but ecologically vital, Namibia's Ugab River only flows above ground for a few days each year. The subterranean waters underlying this ephemeral river, however, are shallow enough in places to fill hollows and sustain a wildlife population that includes the rare desert elephant.This image was acquired by Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 8
[image]Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia - Image provided by the Satellite Systems Branch. This image is part of the ongoing Landsat series.
Namib-Naukluft National Park is an ecological preserve in Namibia's vast Namib Desert. Coastal winds create the tallest sand dunes in the world here, with some dunes reaching 980 feet (300 meters) in height.This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on August 12, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using near infrared, green, and blue wavelengths...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 9
[image]Dunes Along the Kuiseb River - Animation by Jesse Allen, NASA GSFC, based on data from the and
The Kuiseb River in Namibia is bordered on one side by the tallest sand dunes in the world, and on the other by barren rock. The red sand dunes south of the river reach heights over 150 meters. The prevailing winds blow the dunes northward, but their movement is blocked by the river. In the process, so much sand and silt is deposited in the Kuiseb that it only reaches the sea while it is in flood.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Dust Plumes off Namibia - Image by Frank Eckardt, Department of Environmental Science, University of Botswana, based on data from the at NASA GSFC and SRTM data courtesy NASA/JPL/NIMA/USGS, Science Team.
Whisps of white dust sweep off of northern Namibia’s Skeleton Coast in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image, acquired on June 9, 2004 by NASA’s Terra satellite. The image has been draped over data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to show changes in elevation. The resulting 3-D image could help pinpoint the source of blowing dust, though in this image, the source is not entirely clear...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 11
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions and phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Bright colors in the ocean waters off the coast of Namibia tell a story of marine life and death. In this region of the South Atlantic, winds push the warm surface water westward, and cold waters from the bottom of the ocean rush up in their place. The cold water carries with it the nutrients that have sunk to the ocean floor, providing a boon to ocean life. In particular, microscopic plants called phytoplankton thrive on the added nutrients...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruption along the coast of Namibia - Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
A brilliant streak of turquoise water off the Namib Desert coast of Namibia in southern Africa is a tell-tale sign of sulfur rising to the surface. The yellowish clouds of sulfur come from hydrogen sulfide gas produced by anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) at the ocean floor. In this region, strong currents bring abundant food from the bottom of the ocean to nurture large plant and animal populations...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Phytoplankton and Hydrogen Sulfide off the Coast of Namibia - NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, at NASA GSFC
Like neon signs against a black night sky, phytoplankton and hydrogen sulfide form brilliant green streaks in the ocean water off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. Though the two splashes of color are caused by different things, they are connected.On the left, the cloud of green is formed by millions of microscopic plants growing on the surface of the ocean. In this part of the South Atlantic, deep, cold ocean water hits the coast of Africa and pushes to the surface...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Streamers of Dust off Namibia - Image courtesy the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE
On June 24, 2003, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) captured this image of southern Africa showing numerous dust plumes streaming oceanward from the Namibia coastline— a pattern that previously collected SeaWiFS imagery indicates is common in this part of the world at this time of the year. Sensor: OrbView-2/SeaWiFS.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Namibian Dust Storm - Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE
Several large clouds of dust are blowing westward from Namibia in this SeaWiFS image. Sensor: OrbView-2/SeaWiFS. Data Start Date: 9/19/00.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 11
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions along the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
On April 17 and 18, 2004, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite detected several bright green hydrogen sulfide eruptions along the coast of Namibia. The eruptions, which are deadly to fish, occur when bacteria release hydrogen sulfide gas as they break down dead plants and animals that have sunk to the sea floor. As the gas rises to the surface, it interacts with oxygen to form solid white sulfur, which tints the water the bright green color seen here.H...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Sulfur Plume Off Namibia - Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
Off the coast of Namibia in southwest Africa, a cold, deep current snakes northward past the Namib Desert carrying icy waters from deep in the Southern Ocean off Antarctica. Year-round southerly winds cause the warmer surface waters near the coast to be deflected westward away from shore, and the cold waters of the Benguela Current rise up from the depths to replace them.In the ocean, the welling up of cold water has a positive influence on living organisms...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Sulfur plumes off Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Sensor: Terra/MODIS...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruption along the Namibia coast - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Along Namibian coast, off southwest Africa, a cold, deep current snakes northward past the Namib Desert carrying icy waters from deep in the Southern Ocean. Year-round southerly winds cause the warmer surface waters near the coast to be deflected westward away from shore, and the cold waters of the Benguela Current rise up from the depths to replace them.In the ocean, the welling up of cold water has a positive influence on living organisms...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 5
[image]Space Radar Image of Namibia Sand Dunes - NASA
Space Radar Image of Namibia Sand Dunes
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 12
[image]Namibia photo - William Rounds
Namibia photo
Keywords: Namibia*phtot
Downloads: 5
[image]Sulfur plume off Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Off the coast of Namibia in southwest Africa, a cold, deep current snakes northward past the Namib Desert carrying icy waters from deep in the Southern Ocean off Antarctica. Year-round southerly winds cause the warmer surface waters near the coast to be deflected westward away from shore, and the cold waters of the Benguela Current rise up from the depths to replace them.In the ocean, the welling up of cold water has a positive influence on living organisms...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast - Image courtesy the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, at NASA GSFC
Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean’s floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite.The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean’s floor off of ...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 6
[image]Dune Patterns, Namib Desert, Namibia - Astronaut photograph was acquired June 28, 2005, with a Kodak 760C digital camera with a 800 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and the Image Science & Analysis Group, Johnson Space Center. The supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC
This detailed view of the remote Conception Bay sector of the Namibian coastline shows breakers and a strand plain on the left and complex dunes of the Namib dune sea on the right. A strand plain is a series of dunes, usually associated with and parallel to a beach, sometimes containing small creeks or lakes. The complexity and regularity of dune patterns in the dune sea of the Namib Desert have attracted the attention of geologists for decades; however, they remain poorly understood...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 13
[image]Hydrogen sulphide eruptions along the coast of Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
On April 17 and 18, 2004, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite detected several bright green hydrogen sulfide eruptions along the coast of Namibia. The eruptions, which are deadly to fish, occur when bacteria release hydrogen sulfide gas as they break down dead plants and animals that have sunk to the sea floor. As the gas rises to the surface, it interacts with oxygen to form solid white sulfur, which tints the water the bright green color seen here.H...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 4
[image]Namibia - Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from September 19, 2002, shows the beautiful contrasts of the terrain of the southern African country of Namibia. The bright orange sands along the coast are the Namib Desert, while rocky platueaus and escarpments tinged with green vegetation can be seen farther east. Off shore, a large bank of clouds is draped over the South Atlantic...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 12
[image]Namibia - Image by Frank Eckardt, Department of Environmental Science, University of Botswana, based on data from the at NASA GSFC
On the southwest coast of Africa, the soft orange sands of Namibia’s coastal desert rise to a rugged interior plateau, with outcroppings of colorful rocks and pale green vegetation. The large coastal desert is one of the oldest in the world, and is caused by a cool ocean current, called the Benguela Current, snaking its way up from the south along southern Africa’s Atlantic Coast. The cold current suppresses rainfall, but contributes to a morning fog that becomes trapped on the surface of so...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 11
[movies]Dunes Along the Kuiseb River - Animation by Jesse Allen, NASA GSFC, based on data from the and
The Kuiseb River in Namibia is bordered on one side by the tallest sand dunes in the world, and on the other by barren rock. The red sand dunes south of the river reach heights over 150 meters. The prevailing winds blow the dunes northward, but their movement is blocked by the river. In the process, so much sand and silt is deposited in the Kuiseb that it only reaches the sea while it is in flood.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 72
[image]Dust Blowing from Namibia - Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE
Dust can be seen blowing out of northern Namibia in this SeaWiFS image. Sensor: OrbView-2/SeaWiFS. Data Start Date: 5/10/00.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 9
[image]The Optimist, Kalahari Desert, Namibia - Image provided by the Satellite Systems Branch. This image is part of the ongoing Landsat series.
On the edge of the Kalahari Desert in Namibia, sand dunes are encroaching onto once-fertile lands in the north. Healthy vegetation appears red in this image; in the center, notice the lone red dot. It is the result of a center-pivot irrigation system, evidence that at least one optimistic farmer continues to work the fields despite the approaching sand.This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on August 14, 2000...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 20
[image]Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast: Image of the Day - NASA -- Image courtesy the seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEAWIFS.html SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/ MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC
Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Nam...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 31
[texts]Peter Moor's journey to Southwest Africa : a narrative of the German campaign - Frenssen, Gustav, 1863-1945

Keywords: Germans -- Namibia
Downloads: 422
[image]Dune Patterns, Namib Desert, Namibia: Image of the Day - NASA -- Astronaut photograph eol.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/sseop/photo.pl?mission=ISS011&roll=E&frame=9756 ISS011-E-9756 was acquired June 28, 2005, with a Kodak 760C digital camera with a 800 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and the Image Science & Analysis Group, Johnson Space Center. The spaceflight.nasa.gov/home/index.html International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC eol.jsc.nasa.gov/ Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.
This detailed view of the remote Conception Bay sector of the Namibian coastline shows breakers and a on the left and complex dunes of the Namib dune sea on the right. A strand plain is a series of dunes, usually associated with and parallel to a beach, sometimes containing small creeks or lakes. The complexity and regularity of dune patterns in the dune sea of the Namib Desert have attracted the attention of geologists for decades; however, they remain poorly understood...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 23
[image]Oshigambo River and Etosha Pan, Namibia: Image of the Day - NASA -- Astronaut photograph eol.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/sseop/photo.pl?mission=ISS012&roll=E&frame=23057 ISS012-E-23057 was acquired March 2, 2006, with a Kodak 760C digital camera using a 180 mm lens. The regional oblique view, eol.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/sseop/photo.pl?mission=ISS011&roll=E&frame=9504 ISS011-E-9504, was taken June 24, 2005, also with the Kodak 760C and a 180 mm lens. Both images are provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and the Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The images in this article have been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. The spaceflight.nasa.gov/home/index.html International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the eol.jsc.nasa.gov/ NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.
Etosha Pan in northern Namibia is a large, dry lakebed in the Kalahari Desert. The 120-kilometer-long (75-mile-long) lake and its surroundings are protected as one of Namibia's largest wildlife parks. Herds of elephants occupy the dense woodland on the south side of the lake. Mopane trees are common throughout south-central Africa, and host the www.mopane.org/biology.htm mopane worm, which is the larval form of the Mopane Emperor Moth and an important source of protein for rural communities...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 27
[movies]Dunes Along the Kuiseb River : Image of the Day - NASA -- Animation by Jesse Allen, NASA GSFC, based on data from the www.jpl.nasa.gov/srtm/ Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and landsat7.usgs.gov/ Landsat 7.
The Kuiseb River in Namibia is bordered on one side by the tallest sand dunes in the world, and on the other by barren rock. The red sand dunes south of the river reach heights over 150 meters. The prevailing winds blow the dunes northward, but their movement is blocked by the river. In the process, so much sand and silt is deposited in the Kuiseb that it only reaches the sea while it is in flood.
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 60
[movies]Namibia 2011 - Roland Van Leeuwen
travel around tour in 2011 in Namibia. For more information: see website: http://sites.google.com/site/rolandmarianne/
Keywords: Namibia; 2011
Downloads: 377
[image]Namibia: Image of the Day - NASA -- Image by Frank Eckardt, Department of Environmental Science, University of Botswana, based on data from the rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC
On the southwest coast of Africa, the soft orange sands of Namibia's coastal desert rise to a rugged interior plateau, with outcroppings of colorful rocks and pale green vegetation. The large coastal desert is one of the oldest in the world, and is caused by a cool ocean current, called the Benguela Current, snaking its way up from the south along southern Africa's Atlantic Coast. The cold current suppresses rainfall, but contributes to a morning fog that becomes trapped on the surface of some d...
Keywords: Where -- Namibia
Downloads: 28
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